This program will be live on KSCO AM 1080 (www.ksco.com) from 4:00-5:00 (pacific) on Saturday, October 8th. Replays can be heard on www.wagnerandwinick.com and www.voiceamerica.com (Business Channel).
Starting in January, California residents can no longer drive and use their cell phones — for anything. Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation into law that makes it illegal to operate a smartphone with your hands for any reason. 14 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands prohibit all drivers from using hand-held cell phones while driving. All are primary enforcement laws—an officer may cite a driver for using a hand-held cell phone without any other traffic offense taking place.

California Assembly Bill 1785
http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB1785

Distracted Driving Statistics
http://www.distraction.gov/stats-research-laws/facts-and-statistics.html

Distracted Walking Statistics

More than half of cell owners affected by ‘distracted walking’

State by State Cell Phone-Driving Laws
http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/cellphone_laws.html

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Starting in January, California residents can no longer drive and use their cell phones — for anything. Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation (AB 1785) into law that makes it illegal to operate a smartphone with your hands for any reason.

Drivers will have a few months to mentally adjust before the new law is enforced. The goal is to cut down on the number of accidents caused by distracted driving. Using maps services, flipping through your music collection, or browsing traffic reports will now earn drivers a traffic ticket come January.

The new law prohibits drivers from using their phones for anything unless they are using a hands-free or Bluetooth device.

According to California Highway Patrol, distracted driving is a growing problem , one that this law aims to combat. “Sometimes when we’re at scenes of accidents, I have people that pass by during, trying to film the incident and that is definitely unsafe to drive like that through an incident,” CHP officer Jesus Chavez said.

The first law in California to restrict cell phone use while driving was passed roughly a decade ago and since then, cell phones have come a long way, the new law is attempting to keep up with that.
“So not just about answering the phone anymore and texting somebody now. There are a variety of things: GPS, finding directions or reading the news,” Chavez said.

On average, texting takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of five seconds: that’s enough time to travel the length of a football field. “You’re not paying attention or something happens in front of you by the time your mind thinks about it and you react to it, it is definitely too late,” Chavez said.

If drivers mount their phones on something while they drive, they will still be able to swipe at it but taking photos or streaming videos could earn drivers a ticket.

Questions? Call (831) 582-4000